Aquaknow GIS TOOL

The Aquaknow7 GIS Tool is a new piece of software developed within Aquaknow to allow users to perform Spatial and Temporal analysis over water sampling points.

 

 

This paper analyzes the status of legal regulation of emerging contaminants in water sources in Mexico. To this end, its relevance is debated in the context of the constitutional obligations assumed regarding the human right to water and sanitation (HRWS). The international instruments are reviewed and a brief general balance is prepared that allows us to reflect on the legal vacuum of this topic in Mexico.

Finally, four Annexes (135-139) are available in the folder entitled Risk Mapping and E-Readiness Survey. With the COVID-19 pandemic impacting severely the project, a decision to undertake a risk mapping exercise and an online E-readiness evaluation with all CoEs to identify applying distance and on-line learning modalities for the remainder of the project.

The reports on the Impact and the Monitoring & Evaluation undertaken by two external consultants can be found in Annexes 133 and 134. The importance of Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) as well as Impact Study were recognized during the implementation phase of the project. The objective of the M&E activity was to contribute to the development and implementation of a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework for ACEWATER II HCD activities of Pilot Courses and the Mobility and Exchange of staff and students.

Concerning WANWATCE, Phase I deliverables are provided in Annexes 112-118 from Burkina Faso, Ghana, the two CoEs in Nigeria (NWRI, UNIBEN) and Senegal. These reports correspond to the Desk-study assessments as well as National Frameworks for each country. It should be noted nthat although surveys and desk studies contributed to the identification of gap and needs for HCD, validation was not implemented in Burkina Faso. Finally, Annexes 119-132 contain reports and the 13 developed course materials within the WANWATCE network.

 

PHASE I Annexes:

Concerning WANWATCE, Phase I deliverables are provided in Annexes 112-118 from Burkina Faso, Ghana, the two CoEs in Nigeria (NWRI, UNIBEN) and Senegal. These reports correspond to the Desk-study assessments as well as National Frameworks for each country. It should be noted nthat although surveys and desk studies contributed to the identification of gap and needs for HCD, validation was not implemented in Burkina Faso. Finally, Annexes 119-132 contain reports and the 13 developed course materials within the WANWATCE network.

 

SANWATCE Annexes:

PHASE I Annexes:

Annexes 74-81 correspond to deliverables from CEANWATCE with the relevant reports from the following countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda. Phase I consists of reports on the desk study and gap analysis as well as the national Human Capacity Development (HCD) Frameworks, while Phase II deliverables are final reports on the implementation of the HCD trainings, with the nine developed course materials.

CEANWATCE Annexes:

PHASE I Annexes:

- Annex 66: Mbaziira R., 2021. Volume I: Draft Report on Human Capacity Development priorities in the Water Sector in Africa. ACEWATER2 report JRC123098 (Main deliverable)

 

The wealth of natural and human resources, coupled with its water resource development opportunities, made the Zambezi Watercourse ideal for assessing current governance approaches and its effectiveness to support sustainable socio-economic development impact, particularly community and livelihoods scales, through implementing the WEFE Nexus. There were three phases to the study: firstly, a collation and assessment of the Zambezi Watercourse Commission (ZAMCOM) governance documents and approaches; secondly, evaluating the risks identified in the scientific assessments of the study; and lastly, to support existing ZAMCOM initiatives through practicable interventions that would enhance WEFE Nexus implementation, using the findings from Phases 1 and 2. The study established that there was a wealth of information available about various aspects of the Zambezi Watercourse, including the WEFE Nexus. At a macro level, the ZAMCOM Agreement and the Strategic Plan for the Zambezi Watercourse 2018-2040 address the governance framework and related high-level enabling structures. However, implementation of the governance framework across different geographical scales in the watercourse, particularly at the community and household scales for livelihoods benefits was unclear, as were any tangible WEFE Nexus benefits. The key issue from the scientific assessments was the lack of data on the one hand; and secondly, the quality of the available data could be questionable. This would negatively affect objective scientific assessments that were an important basis for governance intervention decisions. The WEFE nexus governance implementation framework proposed in this study took into account these factors including the unique socio-technical and socio-political dynamics of the watercourse. Consideration of indigenous knowledge systems and traditions and the severe resource constraints that are typical of many African situations were a key factor in the implementation framework configuration. The emphasis of the proposed governance implementation framework is not theoretical or academic, but rather a practitioner perspective that is catalytic, practical and realistic.

 

 

- Annex 31: Seetal A., 2020. Water governance, cooperation and information systems: inception report. ACEWATER2 report JRC122955 (Component of deliverable)
- Annex 32: Seetal A., 2020. Water governance, cooperation and information systems: Project Manual “A Catalyst for Practical Governance”. ACEWATER2 report JRC122955 (Main deliverable)

 

The three African nations have said they will continue trying to resolve a conflict over plans for a massive Ethiopian-run dam along the Nile river. The project has raised concerns about shortages of drinking water.

 

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